Janet’s thread

A weblog, mostly about knitting but other topics appear

Seattle Now & Then: The Boone Home March 2, 2015

Filed under: Uncategorized — Janet @ 4:33 pm

Janet:

A taste of Seattle’s history.

Originally posted on DorpatSherrardLomont:

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Sometime around 1890, George Moore, one of Seattle’s most prolific early photographers, recorded this portrait of the home of the architect (and Daniel Boone descendent) William E. Boone.  In the recently published second edition of Shaping Seattle Architecture, the book’s editor, UW Professor of Architecture Jeffry Karl Ochsner, sketches William E. Boone’s life and career.  Ochsner adds, “Boone was virtually the only pre-1889 Fire Seattle architect who continued to practice at a significant level through the 1890s and into the twentieth-century.”   (Courtesy MOHAI) THEN: Sometime around 1890, George Moore, one of Seattle’s most prolific early photographers, recorded this portrait of the home of the architect (and Daniel Boone descendent) William E. Boone. In the recently published second edition of Shaping Seattle Architecture, the book’s editor, UW Professor of Architecture Jeffry Karl Ochsner, sketches William E. Boone’s life and career. Ochsner adds, “Boone was virtually the only pre-1889 Fire Seattle architect who continued to practice at a significant level through the 1890s and into the twentieth-century.” (Courtesy MOHAI)

NOW: During its construction of Interstate-5, the state’s Department of Highways set free the springs of First Hill, a fluid dynamics that required more pumping, concrete and time than expected. NOW: During its construction of Interstate-5, the state’s Department of Highways set free the springs of First Hill, a fluid dynamics that required more pumping, concrete and time than expected.

For Jean Sherrard to record his repeat of George Moore’s historical portrait of Mercy and William Boone’s big home required both prudence and pluck.  The latter took Jean to the edge of…

View original 1,608 more words

 

The Scarves Again March 1, 2015

Filed under: Patterns,Photography,Scarves — Janet @ 1:37 am
Tags:

The sun is shining today so it is time for another picture of my current knitting – scarves.     IMG_5975

IMG_5973  scarves and shadows       IMG_5980  same scarves, different shadows

 

Putting the Pieces Together February 27, 2015

This genealogical research is slow work and  I feel that I am going over the same ground again and again.  But the pieces are gradually coming together.  In 1882 when my paternal grandmother Mary Murdock Miller married a man considerably older than herself, she was taking on 2 step children, Lucy and Charles.  But these children were only slightly younger than herself.    These were the children that I had always thought she had come from Crown Point New York to Newark Ohio to care for.  But I was wrong.  She was age 19, the children age 16 and 15.  The father of Lucy Jewett Miller and Charles Dion Miller had been a widower for many years.  Lucy Jewett, his first wife, had died in 1868.

I have a copy of a very sweet letter written to Lucy by her father Charles when Lucy was 9 or 10.

Had my grandmother actually come out to Newark from Crown Point to be a housekeeper for Charles the father and a teacher for his children Lucy and Charles?  Had she responded to  an advertisement or was there some family connection? or other reason?

What became of Lucy and Charles?  So far as I can determine, Lucy never married and she stayed in Newark all her life, living to the age of 84 – she died in 1940.  Charles gradually moved west and spent his final years in Denver Colorado. He married Maude Parr in Chicago (Englewood) in 1892.  They had 4 children – Lucy Maureen Miller, born in 1894; Charles Oliver Miller, born in Sheldon Iowa in 1897;  Frances David Miller, born in 1898 in            ; and Mary Jewett Miller, born in South Dakota in 1904.  His wife Maude died in 1911 at the age of 39,   He died in 1960 at the age of 93.  He is buried in Denver.

Family View – Ancestry

IMG_0013   my grandfather Major Charles Dana Miller

IMG_0014  my grandmother Mary Murdock Miller

IMG    my father Joseph Buckingham Miller, age 19 (?)

Dad's childhood home Buena Vista Hill Newark Ohio    the family house in Newark Ohio

IMG   1st wife Lucy Jewett (?) or Lucy Jewett Miller the daughter

 

 

Array of 21 Scarves February 24, 2015

Filed under: Cats,Katerina,knitted scarves,Knitting,Scarves — Janet @ 6:43 pm

IMG_5853  21 scarves        IMG_5863

 

Isn’t it time I knit something else?  And sewed in the ends?

 

 

 

IMG_5866  the cat at play

 

 

Continuing the Search for Old-New Relatives

This is a continuation of my previous blog post outlining the descendants of my paternal grandmother – Mary Murdock Miller – tracing her 5 children who in turn had 10 children, making a total of 10 grandchildren for Mary Murdock Miller.  Her eldest child Myrtle had 3 children , her son Joseph had 4 children, and her youngest child Roy had 3 children.

IMG  her son Joseph with his daughter Ruth, picture taken in March (?) 1926, School Street, Belmont Massachusetts

My grandmother’s life straddled the 19th and 20th centuries.  She was born in 1863 in Crown Point New York, upstate New York near the shores of Lake Champlain Vermont.  Born at the turning point of the American Civil War, she experienced 3 more very significant wars in her lifetime – the short lived Spanish American War when William McKinley was President, U.S. involvement in World War One when Woodrow Wilson was President, and the much greater involvement in World War Two under President Roosevelt.  She died in 1954.

When she was born, Abraham Lincoln was in the Oval Office.  Lincoln was followed by Andrew Johnson ho was President from 1865-1869.  In 1869 Grandma would have been 6 years old, just hazily aware of who was President and the significance of that position.  President Andrew Johnson was followed by Ulysses. S. Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes (whose wife Lucy was the first First Lady to graduate from college), James A. Garfield, Chester A. Arthur, Grover Cleveland, Benjamin Harrison, Grover Cleveland again, William McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, Woodrow Wilson, and Warren G. Harding.  Harding and my grandmother were approximately the same age.

Following Warren G. Harding, we have  Calvin Coolidge, Herbert C. Hoover, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, and finally Dwight D. Eisenhower.  It seems like ancient history merging into the modern era.

In a way,  my grandmother’s personal history goes even further back in time than her lifespan.  She can claim to go back almost another 30 years to 1836, the year her husband was born.

Identifying my grandmother by her children and grandchildren –  her daughter Myrtle had 3 children – William, Mary and Nancy; her son Joseph had 4 children –  Bob, Ruth, Nancy, Janet; and her son Roy had 3 children – Muriel, Roy, and Jeanne.

 

Discovering New-Old Relatives February 22, 2015

Filed under: Family,Family history,Genealogy — Janet @ 4:23 am

I have just discovered that one of my aunts married and acquired a stepson from her new husband’s previous marriage.  In fact, there were 2 step-sons from this previous marriage.  What relationship are these stepsons to me?  The marriage took place in 1921.

This aunt, Aunt Myrtle, was one of my father’s siblings.  I have met her only once in my life,  in 1947 when my sister and I traveled from Boston to Raleigh North Carolina where my aunt and her husband and children were living.  My grandmother lived with them also so this was an opportunity to visit her.  Oh how I wish I could remember more about this visit.  It was the only time I met my paternal grandmother.      my grandmother with my father in 1943

IMGme with my grandmother in 1947, Raleigh North Carolina  my grandmother was age 87 when this photo was taken

Aunt Myrtle married William Francis Upshaw in 192  .  He had 2 sons by a previous marriage, Sage Hardin Upshaw and William Francis Upshaw.  Sage was killed in Cambridge England in the 2nd World War.  William died earlier.

Aunt Myrtle and Uncle Will had 3 children – William, Ruth, and Nancy.  All born in Raleigh.   Nancy is the one I met not so long ago at my sister’s farm/home in New Hampshire.  Nancy, so far as I can establish, is still living.  Her husband was an obstetrician.  The day my sisters and I met with them at the farm, Nancy and her daughter Alice told us numerous anecdotes about “Daddy” and his Alzheimers episodes.  They thought it was very funny but I did not find it amusing at all.  This was 10 or 15 years ago.  I assume he is no longer living as I think he would be in his late 90’s if still alive.

Aunt Myrtle lived a long life, as did her mother, Mary Murdock Miller.  Aunt Myrtle was born October 2, 1884; she died 97 years later on October 31, 1981.  Myrtle’s son William W. was born in 1922 and died in 1996.  He served in the U.S. Navy and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.  Myrtle’s daughter Ruth Bryant was born in December 1924 and she died in February 1985.  Myrtle’s 3rd child, a daughter Nancy Miller Upshaw, was born in 1926.  So far as I can ascertain, she is still living.  The daughters, our cousins Mary Bryant and Nancy Miller, were real southern belles in their day.

Nancy had 2 daughters, Alice and Barbara.  I think Alice is deceased.  Barbara is still living.  She researched in great detail the life of our grandfather Major Charles Dana Miller, born in 1836 in Newark Ohio.  She was particularly interested in his service in the American Civil War.  The resulting book is A Struggle for the Life of the Republic, A Civil War Narrative by Brevet Major Charles Dana Miller, 76th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, edited by Stewart Bennett and Barbara Tillery.  Barbara is one of his great granddaughters.

 

Charles Dana Miller married my grandmother Mary Murdock in 1882.  Myrtle was the first child of their union.  There is much more to the story of some of my relatives but that will have to wait for another time.

 

 

Finishing a Book and Finishing Another Scarf February 18, 2015

Filed under: Books,Reading,Scarves,Yarns — Janet @ 9:12 pm

Life has been ticking along with a lot of projects on the burner.  I’m always reading something.  The latest book was A Story Lately Told by Anjelika Huston.  Subtitled Coming of Age in Ireland, London, and New York.  It was very good but I was slow in reading it.  Too many other time-consuming things going on, not the least of which has been FB (Facebook).       IMG_5759

I have also been knitting as we watch television.  There have been any number of good programs in January and February.  e.g. Foyle’s War for the umpteenth time (I could watch it endlessly), the Great British Baking Show, American Experience, Downton Abbey, and so on.  The scarf collection is multiplying.  Here is the the latest one.   IMG_5755  pictured with 2 skeins of Swedish yarn which I bought yesterday at the Nordic Heritage Museum shop, and the Anjelica Huston book.     IMG_5753

 

IMG_5752  3 recently completed scarves.

 

 

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 57 other followers